wat r u do
About me?
My name is Megan. My talents include playing clarinet, ukulele, and some sax, drawing and singing a little bit, making crappy little clay sculptures,and helping old people find things in stores I don't work in. I'm a 16 yr old cis pan white girl. I'm a vegetarian and I support and defend animal rights if the topic comes up. This blog is super nonspecific and I just post whatever I feel or whatever comes up on my dash (humor, fandoms, music and band related stuff, social justice, literally anything). If you need any trigger warnings just message me. I usually put tw on things involving voilence and hate anyway.


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pajameys:

I googled cramps on side of foot and google suggested I cut off my toe

pajameys:

I googled cramps on side of foot and google suggested I cut off my toe

2 days ago on July 21st, 2014 | J | 96,882 notes

coffeecupsandllamas:

theannieplanet:

theannieplanet:

theannieplanet:

so i naturally have these bags under my eyes, right, no matter what i do they dont go away

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anyway so i found out if i stretch my face and tip it up and to the side they go away

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so im just gonna walk around like this forever

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“HEY GUYS”

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ive stopped fighting it

get this post to 100,000 notes

god fucking damnit

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2 days ago on July 21st, 2014 | J | 278,124 notes

How does music work i need someone to explain to me like why does music have an effect on people im a music major i should understand this but like its just vibrations in the air occurring as sound why does it make me emotional how do vibrations make me cry like if i hear songs from doctor who or spirited away it can make me feel sad like all hope is lost or like i can do anything and all powerful or it can make me feel so wonderful like the whole of creation is just waiting for me to explore it. And why do major chords sound happy and why do minor chords sound sad and confused like its just vibrations together why does it makes me feel anything at all I need to knoowww.

2 days ago on July 21st, 2014 | J | 0 notes

floororanges:

chief is officially town sugar daddy

2 days ago on July 21st, 2014 | J | 375 notes
2 days ago on July 21st, 2014 | J | 36,905 notes

nodaybuttodaytodefygravity:

when you make a joke and someone tells you “that’s not very nice”

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2 days ago on July 21st, 2014 | J | 508,583 notes

raidensexual:

please donate i havent eaten in 3 days

2 days ago on July 21st, 2014 | J | 730 notes
patrickthomson:

this is your periodic reminder that old-timey medicines did not fuck around

patrickthomson:

this is your periodic reminder that old-timey medicines did not fuck around

2 days ago on July 21st, 2014 | J | 40,664 notes
jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

2 days ago on July 21st, 2014 | J | 16,157 notes

I cant stop crying but I’m not really sad. I dont know what it is? If I’m just too emotional or what but something can just set me off and then I cant stop crying. It can be something as simple as seeing a Van Gogh painting or hearing a song from a movie or hearing a string of words that have meaning to me and then i just start bawling and its totally involuntary. I dont know why it happens. Sometimes it kind of makes sense but other times its just crying for no reason. Like in april I went to the 9-11 memorial and it was sad but it wasn’t so sad to make me cry like I didn’t lose family or know anyone who died but i started crying uncontrollably and it worried some of my friends. Like certain words or feelings or circumstances can just make me so sad for no reason and then i can’t control myself like theres a wet spot on my bed where I’ve been crying and its because i looked up pictures of Van Gogh paintings.

2 days ago on July 21st, 2014 | J | 0 notes